Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

Sean Nicholas Savage Loves Bad Singing

February 13, 2017
Text by Maxi Krennmayr
Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

PW-Magazine met with the bedroom-pop-poet with the angelic voice Sean Nicholas Savage to talk about big songs, bad singing, the strength and weakness of suits and perfect pitches.

Vienna has them, those days, where the sky just refuses to offer even a glimpse of happiness, people have the collars of their dark coats put up and on the metro there is just monotone silence. How happy can we be to have the likes of Sean Nicholas Savage in our world, who manage to take all that heaviness off our shoulders with just a simple ballad.

Only his appearance, his bleach-blonde hair and his gentle gestures will make the most mundane environment a tad more extravagant, which makes it seem almost thought-out that we find him in the gray-in-gray backstage kitchen of brut Wien over paprika chips and peanut flips. He is already glammed up for the show in a golden button down shirt and a heavily shoulder-padded pin-stripe suit.

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

»I look like a Las Vegas guy. I wear suits all the time, they are often the most practical and fashionable pieces available, but I hate the idea it’s the men’s costume. It’s the male patriarchy that stains everything, it’s terrible. So wearing suits is both powerful and a weakness.«

The fist in the the album’s title is thus strongly misleading, it is not the one of fascism and dictators that he had in mind. »The fist has power, when I make a fist, I fill it with beautiful energy, it’s a pose, much like in a dance and not as in a fight.«

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

He does not think he was a born singer, he grew into one »I always loved singing and wanted to be singer, but I wasn’t very good - and arguably am still not good. But I love all kinds of singing, much like a cook. He loves all kinds of food and so do I love all singers«. But over the years he became a better singer, at age 25 he thinks he became really good, because of his experience.

You changed me is his most viewed clip on YouTube. »Because it’s the best. The message is: relationships, whether romantic or not, are about compromise. But compromise is not about meeting in the middle but about both people bending in and taking on the other person, good and bad. It means you are getting better but you are also getting worse, you don’t just change the parts you like. But when you do, it’s a really special thing.«

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

Would he call his music melancholic?

»Some people say it’s bittersweet. They could call it bummer music, I try to make my music uplifting, but it’s soft and it’s emo so you probably would not want to turn it up at a party.« He grew up in Canada, but lives in Berlin now, »I travel a lot, but mentally and psychologically I live in Berlin«. Asked about the scene there he comes up with one name really quick »I love Molly Nilsson, she is super inspiring.« But he says that his influences do not come from one certain scene or genre.

One strong reference he can hardly deny is the eighties. Does it bother him to be put into that box? »I love the eighties, it was a special time. That was when we got the drum machine and the synth. Suddenly it became a lot cheaper to record music, it was the dawn of what I do. Today you make music on your computer at home and bring it to a show, that’s todays folk guitar, you are a solo-full-arrangement musician.«

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

Of course he loves George Michael, Prince, Freddy Mercury and Boy George: »They had the synths to make perfection, but they didn’t have autotune. Boy Georges singing on Do you really want to hurt me is so flat, it’s perfect.« At first glimpse you would suspect Nicholas of being out of tune in some of his songs, too, but there is intention behind it. »People are so obsessed about pitch, but it is not about pitch, it is about the right tone. The thing is: pitch is a quick way to get a perfect tone, because a perfect pitch is a good tone. But if you have the tone, you don’t need the pitch. He (Boy George) sounds beautiful and is out of key. I love bad singing, I love out of key singing, but I also love autotune.«

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

Autotune?

»Yes, I use it as much as i can, but as I said, I love out of key singing, so I use it to make it more beautiful, not to cover up something. I don’t think autotune has to be unreal or robotic, I think it can be really human, it’s instrumental. Autotune sounds like a bagpipe (imitates playing a bagpipe). What I also like about it, is that you can sing really wild, where there is no way you could hit the notes and then you tune it and it’s got the wildness of someone who doesn’t even care about hitting the notes and the aesthetically pleasing perfect pitch.«

In one interview he said, he likes to play Elton John songs, because people do not make those big songs anymore. »Why don’t you make them?«

Sean Nicholas Savage by Alex Goll
Photo by Alexander Goll

»Because I am not Elton John, Elton John is the bomb! I think he is a vessel for pop, he is a brilliant songwriter, he has been touched many times. He came out, it really hurt his career, he pushed through it. I grew up seeing him as those funny guy, not taking him seriously and then I realized he is the best, he is just so tough. His songs are so strong, like the heaviest metal.«

And this is where he has to run for the show, that he finishes equally strong with a surprise interpretation of Can you feel the love tonight.

His most recent album Magnificent Fist was released on Arbutus Records. Stay tuned for his soon-to-be-released book of poetry.

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PW-Magazine is a Vienna-based online magazine for contemporary culture. By giving voice to a wide array of cutting-edge personas in art and culture, the magazine promotes diversity and a broad mix of artistic expression. The editorial team is tasked not only with reflecting current cultural production, but also with creating new visual content. The platform works with open structures and attaches great importance to collaborations that create new links between cultural creators and the public.
PW-Magazine was founded in May 2016 by Christian Glatz and Phil Koch.

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