Blog

Blog

Alex Da Corte »Slow Graffiti« at Vienna Secession

Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.

Alex Da Corte’s skeleton of a neon city shifts the White cube of the Secession into a hazy twilight. It carries the wrinkles of a life lived, the ghosts of human presence. To quote Oscar Wilde in The Picture of Dorian Gray, “Sin is a thing that writes itself across a man’s face. It cannot be concealed.” Velvet-clad walls and a patchwork carpet that covers the floor with its template pattern give the setting a soft touch. Various objects and sculptures assembled in Doctor Frankenstein’s spirit are scattered on the floor. Set in a quiet sitting area, a video is screened every 20 minutes: a shot-for-shot remake of Jørgen Leth’s The Perfect Human (DK, 1967). Slow Graffiti, Da Corte’s interpretation of this film features the artist masked as Boris Karloff and Frankenstein’s monster to a score by Devonté Hynes.

Slow Graffiti radiates softness, vulnerability, mutability, and transience—like the verve of an invisible city, one that exists only in someone’s imagination but that takes shape here. Against the backdrop of today’s accelerated digital world, the exercised care and communal spirit of making can be considered a radical act of transgression.

Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.
Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.
Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.
Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.
Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.
Alex Da Corte at Vienna Secession
Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view, Secession 2017.

Courtesy of Maccarone, New York, Gió Marconi, Milan and David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen. Photos by Sophie Thun

www.secession.at

About

PW-Magazine is a Vienna-based online magazine for contemporary culture. By giving voice to a wide array of cutting-edge personas in art and culture, the magazine promotes diversity and a broad mix of artistic expression. The editorial team is tasked not only with reflecting current cultural production, but also with creating new visual content. The platform works with open structures and attaches great importance to collaborations that create new links between cultural creators and the public.
PW-Magazine was founded in May 2016 by Christian Glatz and Phil Koch.

Contact

editorial@pw-magazine.com

Team

Marie-Claire Gagnon
Christian Glatz
Ada Karlbauer
Phil Koch
Amar Priganica
Julius Pristauz
Laura Schaeffer

Authors

Hannah Christ
Elisabeth Falkensteiner
Wera Hippesroither
Juliana Lindenhofer
Pia-Marie Remmers
Alexandra-Maria Toth